Courses

Our Courses provide students with a plan of study to evaluate the material to be covered.

Everyone processes and learns new information in different ways. There are three main cognitive learning styles: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. The common characteristics of each learning style listed below can help you understand how you learn and what methods of learning best fits you. Understanding how you learn can help maximize time you spend studying by incorporating different techniques to custom fit various subjects, concepts, and learning objectives. Each preferred learning style has methods that fit the different ways an individual may learn best.

 

Common Characteristics

Visual

• Uses visual objects such as graphs, charts, pictures, and seeing information
• Can read body language well and has a good perception of aesthetics
• Able to memorize and recall various information
• Tends to remember things that are written down
• Learns better in lectures by watching them

Auditory

• Retains information through hearing and speaking
• Often prefers to be told how to do things and then summarizes the main points out loud to help with memorization
• Notices different aspects of speaking
• Often has talents in music and may concentrate better with soft music playing in the background

Kinesthetic

• Likes to use the hands-on approach to learn new material
• Is generally good in math and science
• Would rather demonstrate how to do something rather than verbally explain it
• Usually prefers group work more than others

Yoga & Pilates in Amateur & Professional Sport Buy

  • When: March 12th & 13th 2016
  • Venue: Pilates Manchester, 5 Wharfe rd,Sale, Cheshire, M33 2AF (parking available outside)
  • Times: 10-5pm daily ( 6 hours lessons plus one hour lunch)
  • CPD: 12 hours
  • Cost: £275 or Early Bird £249 (valid 4 weeks before course date)
  • Course Pre-requite Reading: “Fascia, Anatomy & Movement”-Jo Avison, “Bowen Unravelled”- Julian Baker

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This course is open to sports coaches, pilates teachers, yoga instructors, physiotherpists, chiropractors, osteopaths, sports massage, dance teachers, exercise to music and fitness/games teachers, sports massage and all movement practitioners including holistic.

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YOGA ALLIANCE ACCREDITED

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Playing sport and doing regular exercise is good for your health, but can sometimes result in injuries. “Each year 1-1.5 million people attend an A&E department in Britain due to a sporting injury” (Nicholl et al 1991 cited in Boyce and Quigley 2004)”.  A substantial number of amateur sports athletes believe that the only treatment pathway available for them to get pain relief and advice is to attend A&E (Grimble et al, 1993) leading to approximately 5,600 a day Accident and Emergency (A&E) department attendances within the UK for sports related injuries (Cook et al, 2003). According to Falvey et al (2009) this accounts for the majority of the workload of an A&E department, with the highest number of attendances being on Monday as a result of weekend sports fixtures.

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Sports injuries can be caused by:

  • An accident – such as a fall or heavy blow
  • Not warming up properly before exercising
  • Using inappropriate equipment or poor technique
  • Pushing yourself too hard

Almost any part of the body can be injured, including the muscles, bones, joints and connective tissues (tendons and ligaments). The ankles and knees are some of the most commonly affected areas.

Some of the sports that we will cover are:

  1. Football
  2. Rugby
  3. Running
  4. Cycling
  5. Tennis
  6. Basketball
  7. Cricket
  8. Golf
  9. Hockey
  10. Riding
  11. Surfing
  12. Skiing
  13. Sailing
  14. Swimming
  15. Climbing

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Aims: Whilst prevention of injury is certainly desirable, the reality that athletes will be injured is part of sport participation. Thus, the sport rehabilitator or movement practitioner must always be prepared to administer the care for which they are trained. The aim of this unit is to provide learners with an overview of injury prevention and prehabilitation using Yoga/Pilates and functional movement.

Objectives:

  1. Prepare an individual to successfully participate in sport using expertise from multiple specialities.
  2. Managing the injuries that occur to sport participants also requires input from many specialists. Enable the practitioner to understand and work along side other professionals e.g. coach, club manager, conditioning specialist, bio mechanist, physiotherapist, nutrition- its, exercise physiologist, chiropodist, chiropractor and strength etc.
  3. Be able to understand that before beginning any rehabilitation or strengthening exercise program it is important to get an accurate diagnosis of your injury or understand your training aims.
  4. Outline strengthening and rehabilitation exercises for various parts of the body.
  5. Most rehabilitation programs will go through and acute stage, immediately after injury, a middle or rehabilitation stage where the aim is to regain normal movement and strength and finally a functional or sports specific phase where exercises are more relevant to the activity. Prepare the athlete for the final stage.
  6.  Know about a range of sports injuries and their symptoms.
  7.  Know how to apply methods of treating sports injuries.
  8. Raise awareness of static and dynamic stretching and when to use.Share this